By Simon Morris, Senior Physiotherapist

January, oh January. The Christmas bells have ceased ringing, the lights and decorations are down and the scales seem to be out of calibration and reading too high!

However, we are still buzzing from fresh New Year’s resolutions and revitalised after some downtime with family and friends. We are ready to tackle the year ahead, whether it be starting pre-season training for your winter sport, that drunken commitment to the 70.3 at a Christmas party or the New Year fitness regimen.

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By Megan Thomas, Director & Senior Physiotherapist

We are excited to announce that on Monday March 4 PhyxMe will launch a brand new specialist Pilates studio: Q Pilates.

Part of the Allsports Physiotherapy Group, Q Pilates is a leading provider of physio-based Pilates in south east Queensland and Cairns will be the first studio opened in regional Queensland.

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DECEMBER – JANUARY 2019 Opinion column, by Megan Thomas

With our world ever-changing and transitioning to one of electronic communication, I question what effect this will have on business networking events.

So often my generation, and those before us, are still invited to networking drinks, breakfasts and lunches, where we are encouraged to talk, hand out paper business cards and make contact with fellow business owners and entrepreneurs. Read more

OCTOBER – NOVEMBER 2018 by Megan Thomas

Jesse Elliott asks: What can you do to reduce the level of DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) after exercise?

MEGAN: Hi Jesse, I’m going to commence by asking you a question – how much DOMS is too much? I think it’s important to remember that part of doing exercise is to get stronger muscles, which causes small muscle tears so the muscle grows. DOMS is part of this process. DOMS can also be from lactic acid build up and simple muscle fatigue from doing strenuous work.

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By Megan Thomas, Director & Senior Physiotherapist

Does my child have growing pains?

Growing pains are a mysterious but common complaint in young children, usually affecting boys and girls between the ages of 3-5 and 8-11. The pain is mostly nocturnal (no sleep for mum and dad either!)  and occurs in the muscles (not in the joints) around the calf, behind the knee, front of thigh and arms. They don’t cause your child to limp and they don’t have any difficulty walking, playing or exercising. Growing pains don’t cause any long-term damage.

“Treatment” for growing pains can involve

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